Men Need to Pay Attention to Bone Health

Osteoporosis causes the skeleton to weaken and become brittle, making it easy to fracture or break. Too often, osteoporosis is a disease that is attributed only to women because men tend to have larger skeletons with bone loss starting later in life and progressing more slowly. Nevertheless, in just the United States, millions of men suffer from osteoporosis.1

Because osteoporosis often goes undiagnosed, it is especially important to prevent it. Known as a “silent disease,” osteoporosis may not exhibit any symptoms until a fracture actually occurs. Men in their fifties do not experience the rapid loss of bone mass that women do in the years following menopause; however, by age 65 or 70, men and women lose bone mass at the same rate as well as the decrease in ability to absorb calcium.2

There are two main types of osteoporosis: primary and secondary. The primary type is caused by age-related bone loss. The secondary type is caused by bone loss related to unhealthy lifestyle habits, such as smoking and excessive drinking of alcohol, lack of exercise and a diet low in calcium. Although men of any race can develop osteoporosis, Caucasians seem most at risk as well as men who have chronic diseases that affect the kidneys, lungs, stomach and intestines.3

Since osteoporosis is often asymptomatic, both men and women need to be self-aware and see their physicians if they notice a change in posture, height or the onset of back pain. These are all signs of possible osteoporosis and a bone mineral density test can confirm whether the disease is present or in the precursor stages.

If a diagnosis of osteoporosis is made, the treatment plan may include calcium and/or vitamin D supplements, exercise and a change in diet. There are also medications that may be prescribed, but this is a source of much continuing controversy as there are risks of negative side effects, even though the drugs are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.4

There have been fewer research studies on osteoporosis in men than in women; however, the consensus is that both genders should take steps to preserve bone health. Here are some preventative measures:

  • Ensure a daily calcium intake that is adequate for your age. For example, recommended calcium intake for those 9-18 years old is 1,300 mg daily but it decreases to 1,000 mg for men 19-70 years old and women up to 50 years old. At 51 years for women and 70 years for men, the recommended calcium intake increases to 1,200 mg.5
  • Ensure an adequate intake of vitamin D. 600 IU daily is recommended, while men over age 70 should increase intake to 800 IU daily.6
  • Participate regularly in weight-bearing exercises in which bones and muscles work against gravity. An Active Wellness regimen is easy to start simply with walking, jogging and climbing stairs.
  • Incorporate resistance exercises into your daily routine. Start with lifting small weights and work up to heavier ones. Or use the resistance machines at a gym.
  • Some medications are known to cause bone loss, for example, those known as glucocorticoids.7 If you take them or other medications, check with your doctor for known side effects that affect bone loss.

Check out the Nikken Bone Health Pack. Composed of Kenzen® Calcium Complex and Kenzen BDZ™, these partner products deliver maximum support for the body’s skeletal system. Bone buddies are your best friends for life.

Remember to Celebrate Father’s Day with our special Limitless Energy Pack—with the purchase of a KenkoTouch®, you also receive two Kenzen Ten4® and two black KenkoTherm DUK® Tape—available only through June 14!

 

1,2 https://www.bones.nih.gov/health-info/bone/osteoporosis/men

3 https://www.bones.nih.gov/health-info/bone/osteoporosis/men#c

4 https://www.naturomedica.com/blog/news/osteoporosis/what-are-the-controversies-surrounding-osteoporosis-medications

5, 6, 7 https://www.bones.nih.gov/health-info/bone/osteoporosis/men#e

When Do You Need Calcium?

Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the human body. It helps to form and maintain healthy teeth and bones. By maintaining a proper level of calcium in the body over a lifetime, we can help prevent osteoporosis.1 In addition, calcium is used throughout the body to help with blood clotting, sending and receiving nerve signals, flexing and relaxing muscles, releasing hormones and other chemicals and keeping a regular heartbeat—all important functions.

Calcium is the most abundant mineral found in the human body, but as we age, we absorb less and less calcium from our diets. This results in our bodies taking more from our bones, which can contribute to osteopenia or osteoporosis.2 How much calcium we need depends on age and gender. Adolescents, especially girls, postmenopausal women and the elderly often have a high risk of calcium deficiency.3

Recent research shows that a diet high in calcium and also high in protein and other essential nutrients can positively impact bone health by aiding in more calcium absorption. Most of these nutrients can be found in high-quality dairy products like organic whey protein, raw unpasteurized milk, organic goat cheese, and kefir.4 Other sources of calcium include green leafy vegetables, salmon and sardines, nuts, blackstrap molasses, tofu and calcium-fortified foods, such as orange juice, soy milk, cereals and seeds.

Although the calcium found in dairy is considered the most readily absorbed, these foods are not eaten by various segments of the population, including vegans and those who are lactose intolerant. When dietary calcium is not sufficient, a supplement may be needed, and there are many kinds. Some of the common calcium supplements include Calcium carbonate, Calcium citrate, Calcium gluconate, and Calcium lactate. It’s recommended that not more than 500 mg of calcium be taken at one time.5 No matter how much we take of any supplement, if it cannot be assimilated by the digestive system and used by the body’s systems, it will not support an Active Wellness lifestyle.

Kenzen® Calcium Complex stands out specifically for its high bioavailability. That means it is easily absorbed: The complex mimics the mineral composition of our bones. In addition to 400 mg of Calcium derived from whey isolates of milk, vitamins and minerals that enhance calcium absorption are added, including vitamin D, phosphorus, zinc, boron and copper. (Magnesium and potassium are found in the TruCal® blend itself and not separately listed.) Furthermore, Kenzen® Calcium Complex is produced with sensitive filters that purify and separate out the calcium-rich minerals used in the formulation from the lactose and proteins, so that it may be tolerated by virtually everyone. Nonetheless, if you are severely allergic to milk and milk byproducts, we recommend consulting your physician.

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1 https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002412.htm

2 https://www.medicine.wisc.edu/rheumatology/hansenresearchcalcium

3 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4337919/

4, 5 https://draxe.com/calcium-deficiency/