Stay Away from Foods with Dyes and Preservatives

October is ADHD Awareness Month. ADHD stands for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and its prevalence has increased in recent decades. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that more than seven percent of children and between four and six percent of adults in the United States have ADHD.1 Symptoms of the condition include having a hard time organizing and completing tasks, difficulty concentrating. focusing and listening, impulsivity, forgetfulness, impatience and poor time management.

While there are many drugs that claim to improve ADHD by balancing the brain’s neurotransmitters, these medications can also cause potential side effects including sleep problems, mood swings, loss of appetite, high blood pressure and even suicidal thoughts or actions. 2

Researchers continue to find alternative treatment methods that revolve around lifestyle modifications, many of which fit perfectly with Active Wellness. Here are some things that are believed to help minimize ADHD symptoms when eliminated from the diet:

  • Avoid foods with dyes and preservatives. The Mayo Clinic noted that certain food colorings and preservatives may increase hyperactive behavior in some children, specifically sodium benzoate (commonly found in carbonated beverages, salad dressing and fruit juice products), FD&C yellow no. 5 and no. 6, FD&C red no. 3 and no. 40, D&C yellow no.10, FD&C blue no. 1 and no. 2, FD&C green no. 3, orange B and citrus red no. 2.3 Basically, be careful with anything that has food coloring.
  • Avoid foods with chemical additives such as BHT and BHA. They are generally used to keep the oil in a product from going bad. They’re also found in processed foods such as potato chips, chewing gum, cake mixes, cereal and instant mashed potatoes.4
  • Avoid foods with salicylates. These are natural substances that are actually abundant in healthy foods such as red apples, almonds, cranberries, grapes and tomatoes. Salicylates are also found in aspirin and other pain medications. Research has shown that when salicylates are eliminated from the diets of hyperactive patients, 30 to 50 percent of them showed improvement.5
  • Allergens can be found in healthy foods but they might affect brain functions and trigger hyperactivity or inattentiveness if the body is sensitive to them. To see if any of the following foods can help decrease ADHD, eliminate them one at a time. They are the top eight food allergens: wheat, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, soy, fish and shellfish.6
  • Avoid sugar and gluten. Two studies done in Holland demonstrated that eliminating them improved symptoms in 70 percent of the children in their studies.7
  • Avoid produce grown with pesticides and livestock raised with hormones and antibiotics. Go organic whenever possible to avoid accumulating chemicals, even in low doses, in the body and brain.

The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention recommend the following behaviors to calm the mind and ease the tendency for overactivity:

  • Eat lean proteins which help increase focus and provide the building blocks for brain health. Make sure to eat small amounts, as large quantities of protein at one time can overburden the digestive system. Protein powders can be a good source, but whey can be overstimulating for some people, so the safer choice is pea protein. This makes Kenzen Vital Balance® an ideal choice.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking water. The brain is made up of 80 percent water and needs to stay hydrated. Caffeine and alcohol are dehydrating and can impair cognition and judgment. Carrying a PiMag® Sport Bottle that can be filled at any tap is a good habit to develop.
  • Eat healthy fats, especially those with omega-3 fatty acids found in foods like salmon, sardines, avocados, walnuts, chia seed and dark green leafy vegetables. Supplement with Kenzen® Omega Green+DHA  to fill in dietary gaps.
  • Get at least 60 minutes of physical activity daily.
  • Get plenty of sleep.
  • Limit daily screen time from phones, computers and TV.
  • Cook with herbs and spices. Garlic, oregano and turmeric are believed to boost blood flow to the brain, while there is scientific evidence that shows rosemary, thyme and sage help improve memory.8 Try incorporating Kenzen® Clarity into your daily regimen, as it’s formulated specifically to help maximize cognitive function.*

ADHD can be challenging, but by eating well and avoiding food triggers, both children and adults may be able to improve productivity and decrease or eliminate medications. Whether you may have ADHD or not, Active Wellness is the lifestyle of choice.

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

1 https://www.healthline.com/health/adhd/foods-to-avoid

2, 3, 4 https://www.healthline.com/health/adhd/natural-remedies

5, 6 https://www.healthline.com/health/adhd/foods-to-avoid

7, 8 https://www.additudemag.com/adhd-diet-nutrition-sugar/

 

What is Particular About Women’s Health and Fitness?

Eat well, exercise regularly and avoid high-risk behaviors such as smoking, excessive drinking and unnecessary drug use. This is common sense that applies to virtually everyone. In other words, practice Active Wellness.

What is particular to women’s health and fitness? Women’s health includes a range of specialties, such as birth control and gynecology, breast, ovarian, uterine and cervical cancers, menopause and hormone therapy, osteoporosis, pregnancy and childbirth, heart disease specific to women and more.1

Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in women. If you have a family or personal history of breast cancer, your risk for developing this condition is higher. The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that women of average risk have a mammogram screening every two years between the ages of 50 and 74. They also recommend for women with an average risk of developing breast cancer to have their first screening in their 40s. Many doctors and medical groups recommend yearly mammograms starting at age 40. If you have a family history of breast cancer, your doctor may recommend you start earlier. These medical professionals also encourage women to conduct self-exams on a monthly basis starting at age 20.

Health practitioners generally advise women to get a Pap test to check for cervical cancer every three years when 21 or older. Between 30-65, women can get both a Pap test and HPV test every five years. Women older than 65 may be able to stop testing if the doctor determines you are low risk.2

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among American women, and women are more likely than men to die following a heart attack. Women are known to exhibit symptoms leading up to a heart attack that are less well known than men—often this results in ignoring the symptoms until it’s too late. As with men, women’s most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting and back or jaw pain.3 In fact, women may experience a heart attack without chest pressure—instead, they may feel a shortness of breath, pain in the abdomen, dizziness, lightheadedness or fainting, upper back pressure or extreme fatigue.4 A heart attack can be misconstrued as acid reflux, the flu or normal discomforts related to aging.

Men and women share many of the same risk factors for stroke, including high blood pressure and high cholesterol. However, women have several unique risk factors that make them more likely to have a stroke than men. Risk increases with the use of birth control pills, pregnancy and hormone replacement therapy.5 A healthy Mediterranean diet and a consistent exercise regimen are preventative measures. Choose supplementation with Kenzen Bergisterol® and Kenzen® Omega Green+DHA to help support heart health.

Women also are more at risk than men for developing osteoporosis, due to their tendency to have smaller, thinner bones. Estrogen, a hormone in women that protects bones, decreases sharply when women reach menopause, which can cause bone loss. Of the estimated 10 million Americans with osteoporosis, about 80% are women, and a woman’s risk of breaking a hip is equal to her combined risk of breast, uterine and ovarian cancer.6 The good news is that osteoporosis can be prevented—denser, stronger bones can be built by getting enough calcium and vitamin D, exercise and practicing Active Wellness. The key is to start early in life, from childhood through the teen years and onward. The Kenzen® Bone Health Pack with Kenzen® Calcium Complex and Kenzen® BDZ is exceptional. Partner products deliver naturally sourced calcium and minerals complemented by a formula that actively binds calcium to the bone matrix.*

Look for other aspects of women’s health and fitness in future blogs. For now, remember to eat well, exercise consistently, get regular physicals with your health practitioners and keep your bones strong!

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

1 https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007458.htm

2 https://www.webmd.com/women/features/women-top-health-tips#1

3, 4 https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/heart-attack/warning-signs-of-a-heart-attack/heart-attack-symptoms-in-women

5 https://www.healthline.com/health/womens-health#breasts

6 https://www.nof.org/preventing-fractures/general-facts/what-women-need-to-know/

 

Why are Omega Fatty Acids Important?

The “3” in Omega-3 refers to the three major types of fatty acids that are found in food and used by our bodies. They are: ALA-alpha-linolenic acid, EPA-eicosapentaenoic acid and DHA-dicosahexaenoic acid. Once consumed, the human body converts ALA to EPA and DHA. Because the human body can create EPA and DHA in this way, they are not considered essential fatty acids. On the other hand, ALA cannot be produced by the human body and is considered an essential fatty acid that needs to be obtained from the diet. Omega-3s are important components of virtually all cell membranes, so having a balance of these fatty acids are necessary to maintain good health.

ALA is found in land-based plant foods, especially nuts, seeds, soybeans, green leafy vegetables, and some refined oils like walnut and flax seed oil. Since EPA and DHA are found in so few food types, when you hear people say omega-3 fatty acids, they are almost always referencing alpha-linolenic acid (ALA).1

Due to the many reported health benefits, many healthcare professionals recommend daily supplements, whether they’re omega vegetarian capsules made from algae, from fish oil (salmon, mackerel, anchovies, tuna, etc.), or from a crustacean (krill). For those with shellfish allergies, krill oil should be avoided.

Known as a primary source of omegas, supplements made from fish oil are by far the cheapest. Given how polluted the oceans are, fish oils can be contaminated with a variety of toxins. The process of detoxifying fish oils increases the oxidation and diminishes the omega and nutrient content. In addition, the world’s fish supply is diminishing in direct contrast to the increasing toxic load of the fish.

Omega-3, Omega-6 and Omega-9 oils have been identified as being especially important. An omega supplement must offer all three of these oils to be of greatest value. The importance of supplementation with omega fatty acids for heart health and brain health2 is in direct conflict with the risk of ingesting toxins through fish oils.

Nikken has been aware of this dichotomy for years. The answer is Kenzen® Omega Green+DHA. The plant sourced omega fatty acids for Kenzen Omega Green + DHA are cranberry seed oil, flax seed oil and red algae, each of which is easily renewable.

  • Cranberry seed oil contains naturally occurring substances called phytosterols that structurally resemble the human body’s cholesterol. Phytosterols reduce LDL (bad cholesterol) but do not affect HDL (good cholesterol). Eating foods with phytosterols may cut the risk for heart disease when consumed as part of a healthy eating plan, according to the Cleveland Clinic. 3 Cranberry seed oil is considered unique among fixed oils because it contains a very high essential fatty acid profile in addition to a high antioxidant load. 4
  • Flax seed oil contains ALA and has been advocated to combat cardiovascular disease. The use of flax seed oil as a nutritional intervention for the prevention of heart disease has received increasing amounts of research attention. 5
  • Red algae has been used for thousands of years as a food source, especially in Asian cultures. It is high in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that are easily utilized by the human body to help boost the immune system and nourish skin.  The main benefits of red algae are its ability to promote healthy circulation in the body, to help regulate blood sugar levels and to help lower bad cholesterol levels. High in dietary fiber, it is also a rich source of calcium and magnesium so it contributes to bone health.6

Consuming Kenzen® Omega Green+DHA gives you all the benefits of an omega supplement and none of the risks. It helps carnivores, vegetarians and vegans to obtain the right balance of omega-3, omega-6 and omega-9 for Active Wellness without the risk associated with fish oil toxins.

We’re offering our Consultants a special on Kenzen® Omega Green+DHA from 8:00 AM PST, August 16, 2017 until 5:00 PM PST, August 22, 2017. Place a minimum order of two bottles and receive 75 Nikken Reward Points.  This offer applies to retail or wholesale orders, excluding Autoship. Maximum of 450 NRPs per consultant can be awarded. Nikken Reward Points will be issued on August 24th, 2017. NRPs are nontransferable, not valid toward Autoship, shipping, taxes, and cannot be redeemed for cash or to pay outstanding balances. Nikken Reward Points expire six months from the date issued.

1          https://www.superfoodly.com/benefits-of-vegan-omega-3-epa-dha-sources-vs-fish-oil/

2          http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed

3          http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/benefits-cranberry-seed-oil-10043.html

4          http://www.ingredientstodiefor.com/item/Cranberry_Seed_Oil_Unrefined/1164

5          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2989356/

6          http://www.onegreenplanet.org/vegan-health/the-many-benefits-of-red-algae