Stay Away from Foods with Dyes and Preservatives

October is ADHD Awareness Month. ADHD stands for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and its prevalence has increased in recent decades. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that more than seven percent of children and between four and six percent of adults in the United States have ADHD.1 Symptoms of the condition include having a hard time organizing and completing tasks, difficulty concentrating. focusing and listening, impulsivity, forgetfulness, impatience and poor time management.

While there are many drugs that claim to improve ADHD by balancing the brain’s neurotransmitters, these medications can also cause potential side effects including sleep problems, mood swings, loss of appetite, high blood pressure and even suicidal thoughts or actions. 2

Researchers continue to find alternative treatment methods that revolve around lifestyle modifications, many of which fit perfectly with Active Wellness. Here are some things that are believed to help minimize ADHD symptoms when eliminated from the diet:

  • Avoid foods with dyes and preservatives. The Mayo Clinic noted that certain food colorings and preservatives may increase hyperactive behavior in some children, specifically sodium benzoate (commonly found in carbonated beverages, salad dressing and fruit juice products), FD&C yellow no. 5 and no. 6, FD&C red no. 3 and no. 40, D&C yellow no.10, FD&C blue no. 1 and no. 2, FD&C green no. 3, orange B and citrus red no. 2.3 Basically, be careful with anything that has food coloring.
  • Avoid foods with chemical additives such as BHT and BHA. They are generally used to keep the oil in a product from going bad. They’re also found in processed foods such as potato chips, chewing gum, cake mixes, cereal and instant mashed potatoes.4
  • Avoid foods with salicylates. These are natural substances that are actually abundant in healthy foods such as red apples, almonds, cranberries, grapes and tomatoes. Salicylates are also found in aspirin and other pain medications. Research has shown that when salicylates are eliminated from the diets of hyperactive patients, 30 to 50 percent of them showed improvement.5
  • Allergens can be found in healthy foods but they might affect brain functions and trigger hyperactivity or inattentiveness if the body is sensitive to them. To see if any of the following foods can help decrease ADHD, eliminate them one at a time. They are the top eight food allergens: wheat, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs, soy, fish and shellfish.6
  • Avoid sugar and gluten. Two studies done in Holland demonstrated that eliminating them improved symptoms in 70 percent of the children in their studies.7
  • Avoid produce grown with pesticides and livestock raised with hormones and antibiotics. Go organic whenever possible to avoid accumulating chemicals, even in low doses, in the body and brain.

The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention recommend the following behaviors to calm the mind and ease the tendency for overactivity:

  • Eat lean proteins which help increase focus and provide the building blocks for brain health. Make sure to eat small amounts, as large quantities of protein at one time can overburden the digestive system. Protein powders can be a good source, but whey can be overstimulating for some people, so the safer choice is pea protein. This makes Kenzen Vital Balance® an ideal choice.
  • Stay hydrated by drinking water. The brain is made up of 80 percent water and needs to stay hydrated. Caffeine and alcohol are dehydrating and can impair cognition and judgment. Carrying a PiMag® Sport Bottle that can be filled at any tap is a good habit to develop.
  • Eat healthy fats, especially those with omega-3 fatty acids found in foods like salmon, sardines, avocados, walnuts, chia seed and dark green leafy vegetables. Supplement with Kenzen® Omega Green+DHA  to fill in dietary gaps.
  • Get at least 60 minutes of physical activity daily.
  • Get plenty of sleep.
  • Limit daily screen time from phones, computers and TV.
  • Cook with herbs and spices. Garlic, oregano and turmeric are believed to boost blood flow to the brain, while there is scientific evidence that shows rosemary, thyme and sage help improve memory.8 Try incorporating Kenzen® Clarity into your daily regimen, as it’s formulated specifically to help maximize cognitive function.*

ADHD can be challenging, but by eating well and avoiding food triggers, both children and adults may be able to improve productivity and decrease or eliminate medications. Whether you may have ADHD or not, Active Wellness is the lifestyle of choice.

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

 

1 https://www.healthline.com/health/adhd/foods-to-avoid

2, 3, 4 https://www.healthline.com/health/adhd/natural-remedies

5, 6 https://www.healthline.com/health/adhd/foods-to-avoid

7, 8 https://www.additudemag.com/adhd-diet-nutrition-sugar/

 

A Healthy Mind is Part of Active Wellness

June is Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month, and the Alzheimer’s Association is encouraging families to talk about memory and cognition concerns sooner. Alzheimer’s is a brain disease that causes a slow decline in memory, thinking and reasoning skills. As with virtually any disease, an early diagnosis may offer the opportunity for medical and/or lifestyle interventions that slow down the progression of symptoms. Early testing can also help determine if someone’s cognitive changes are truly the result of Alzheimer’s or another condition.

Here are 10 warning signs listed by the Alzheimer’s Association1:

  1. Memory loss that disrupts daily life: One of the most common signs of Alzheimer’s is forgetting recently learned information. Other symptoms include forgetting important dates or events; asking for the same information over and over; increasingly needing to rely on memory aids (e.g., reminder notes or electronic devices) or family members for things that used to be handled alone.
  2. Challenges in planning or solving problems: Some people may experience changes in their ability to develop and follow a plan or work with numbers. They may have trouble following a familiar recipe or keeping track of monthly bills. Focus may be lacking and simple tasks may take much longer to complete.
  3. Difficulty completing familiar tasks at home, at work or at leisure: For example, sometimes people may get lost going to a familiar location, be unable to manage a budget at work or forget the rules of a favorite game.
  4. Confusion with time or place: People with Alzheimer’s find it difficult to track time. They may only understand something that is happening immediately. They may forget where they are or how they got there.
  5. Trouble understanding visual images and spatial relationships: For some people, having vision problems is a sign of Alzheimer’s. They may have difficulty reading, judging distance and determining color or contrast.
  6. New problems with words in speaking or writing: Following or joining a conversation may become challenging. They may stop in the middle of a conversation and be unable to continue. They may say the same thing over and over. They may call things by the wrong name (e.g., calling a “watch” a “hand-clock”).
  7. Misplacing things and losing the ability to retrace steps: A person with Alzheimer’s disease may put things in unusual places. They may lose things and be unable to retrace their steps to find them again. They may put things in unusual places (e.g., putting a wallet in the refrigerator). When they can’t find things, they may accuse others of stealing.
  8. Decreased or poor judgment: For example, they may use poor judgment when dealing with money, giving large amounts to telemarketers. Their appearance may suffer as they become less aware of cleanliness and tidiness.
  9. Withdrawal from work or social activities: They may have trouble keeping up with a favorite sports team or remembering how to complete a favorite hobby. They may also avoid being social situations because of the changes they have experienced.
  10. Changes in mood and personality: There may be an increase in feelings of confusion, suspicion and depression as well as fearfulness or anxiety. They may be easily upset at home, at work, with friends or in unfamiliar places.

Alzheimer’s is not just a disease of the elderly. Many people with early onset are in their 30s, 40s and 50s. In the United States, it is estimated that approximately 200,000 people have early onset.2 But, can Alzheimer’s be prevented? There are no clear-cut answers yet, but promising research is under way. The Alzheimer’s Association continues to fund studies exploring the influence of exercise, diet, social and mental stimulation, and other factors in the development of Alzheimer’s.3

Common sense dictates that the earlier we participate in an Active Wellness lifestyle, the better our chances of maintaining a Healthy Body and a Healthy Mind. The Nikken line of Kenzen® organic nutritional supplements is the natural way to support the foundation of our health. A fermented blend of 100% organic ingredients formulated to help you stay focused and mentally sharp, Kenzen Clarity is designed to help maximize your cognitive function.*

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

1 https://alz.org/10-signs-symptoms-alzheimers-dementia.asp

2 https://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_early_onset.asp

3 https://alz.org/research/science/alzheimers_prevention_and_risk.asp