Don’t Take Your Eyes for Granted

Eye health is important and those with good sight often take it for granted. Even if your eyes feel healthy, you could have a problem and not know it. That’s because many eye diseases don’t have any symptoms or warning signs. Getting older increases the risk of some eye diseases and a dilated eye exam is the only way to check for them early on, when they’re easier to treat. You might also have a higher risk of some eye diseases if you are overweight or obese, or have a family history of eye disease.1

People often believe that failing eyesight is an inevitable result of aging or eye strain. In truth, a healthy lifestyle can significantly reduce the risk of eye health problems. The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS), published in 2001, found that certain nutrients — zinc, copper, vitamin C, vitamin E and beta carotene — may reduce the risk of age-related decline in eye health by 25 percent.a2 This study was updated in 2013 to test different versions of the original formula. The variations included omega-3 fatty acids, zeaxanthin, lutein, and beta carotene; the study found that certain combinations may work better than others. Further studies agree that omega-3 fatty acids (including DHA), copper, lutein, and zeaxanthin are vital for eye health.

The AREDS reports support 10 nutrient-rich foods.

  1. Fish are rich sources of omega-3 fatty acids. Choose Kenzen® Omega Green + DHA for a vegan option.
  2. Nuts and legumes are also rich in omega-3 fatty acids, plus high in vitamin E, which can protect the age from damage.
  3. Seeds are high in omega-3s and rich in vitamin E.
  4. Citrus fruits are rich in vitamin C, an antioxidant that is recommended to fight age-related eye damage. Kenzen Mega Daily 4® is a great source of vitamin C.
  5. Leafy green vegetables are rich in lutein and zeaxanthin as well as vitamin C—all beneficial for optimal eye health.
  6. Carrots are rich in vitamin A and beta carotene. Vitamin A plays an essential role in vision and is a component of rhodospin, a protein that helps the retina absorb light.3
  7. Sweet potatoes are similar to carrots in being filled with beta carotene. They’re also a good source of vitamin E. Kenzen Mega Daily 4® provides more than the daily requirements for both!
  8. Beef is rich in zinc, which has been linked to better long-term eye health. Zinc can help delay age-related sight loss and macular degeneration. The eye itself contains high levels of zinc, particularly in the retina and the vascular tissue surrounding it.4 Chicken breast and pork loin also contain zinc but at lower levels than beef. Kenzen Mega Daily 4® for the win again, as a healthy source of zinc!
  9. Eggs are great sources of lutein and zeaxanthin, which can help reduce the risk of age-related sight loss. Eggs are also good sources of vitamins C, E and zinc.
  10. Water is essential to eye health as it helps prevent dehydration, which in turn helps reduce the symptoms of dry eyes. Carry an eco-friendly PiMag® Sport Bottle with you everywhere and drink up!

Eye health is crucial to Active Wellness. Kenzen Mega Daily 4® is formulated with a variety of foods that are organically grown in regions where the soils are not depleted by decades of commercial farming. MegaDaily4This ensures that more of the natural, whole-food nutrients are present and correspond more closely to the requirements of the human body than conventional vitamins. For overall health and to help maintain clear vision, Mega Daily 4® is a force to be reckoned with!

 

 

 

1 https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/healthy-vision/keep-your-eyes-healthy

2, 3, 4 https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321226.php

Get the Benefits of Winter Sports without Injuries

Winter activities such as skiing, snowboarding, ice skating, ice hockey and sledding are invigorating ways to experience the great outdoors during the cold months of the year. They’re high speed and therefore can also be perilous, causing many common injuries. These include fractures, sprains, strains, concussions and dislocations. Snowboarders tend to have more wrist injuries as well as tailbone contusions and concussions whereas skiers have more knee injuries.1

Take care of yourselves and properly prepare children for outdoor winter activities. Here are a dozen precautions to take when participating in winter sports:

  • Wear the appropriate protective gear such as helmets, goggles, wrist guards, knee and elbow pads, as well as sunscreen. Check out Nikken KenkoTherm® Wraps for comfortable support for muscles, ligaments and joints.
  • Make sure all equipment is in good working order.
  • Wear layers of clothing that include a breathable base layer, one or two insulating layers and a water- and windproof outer layer to help you stay warm and dry. Layering helps accommodate your body’s changing temperature.
  • Wear comfortable footwear for warmth, dryness and ankle support. If you have weak ankles to begin with, try wrapping them with KenkoTherm DUK® Tape for extra support before putting on your Nikken Sport Socks.
  • Stay hydrated. Breathing cold air can be dehydrating, so bring along a good size water bottle and sip steadily. Convenient and giving you the bonus of ultra high-tech filtration, the eco-friendly PiMag® Sport Bottle is a must-have carry-along. Orthopedists recommend drinking a pint before exercising and another pint after you’re done, with sipping every 20 minutes or so in between.3
  • Warm up. Cold muscles, tendons and ligaments are more injury-prone.
  • After warming up, stretch. Hold each stretch for 10 to 20 seconds, then slowly and carefully release it. Inhale before each stretch and exhale as you release. Do each stretch once, always with control and never bounce on a fully stretched muscle.2
  • Learn how to fall. Shoulder, elbow and wrist injuries can result from trying to brace a fall. According to the Canadian Ski Patrol, the harder you try to stay upright, the harder it is on the knees and the more risk of ligament breaks, strains or tears.4
  • Do not ice skate on frozen lakes, rivers or ponds unless you are absolutely sure they have not started to thaw. The safest way is to ice skate on frozen water masses only where posted signs indicate it’s safe.
  • If snowshoeing or cross-country skiing, be sure to bring a map and a compass. Also be constantly vigilant of changing weather conditions.
  • Never participate alone in a winter sport. If you must go alone, be sure to inform friends and family of your location and expected time of return.
  • Know your limitations and those of your children. Unless you are an athlete training under supervision, rest when tired, and choose slopes and maneuvers that match your skill level.

One of the most enjoyable parts of winter sports is the rest and relaxation afterwards! Why not revive yourself with a hot cup of Kenzen Ten4® Energy Drink Mix and treat yourself to a gentle massage with KenkoTouch®?

 

1 https://www.chop.edu/news/health-tip/perfect-10-winter-sports-safety-tips

2, 3 https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases–conditions/sprains-strains-and-other-soft-tissue-injuries/

4 https://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-you/fitness/9-safety-tips-for-winter-sports/